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Pickle Bean Sprouts - Dua Gia

Pickle Bean Sprouts - Dua Gia 

  • 1 lb bean sprouts
  • 2 carrots, shredded
  • 1 bunch of chives, cut into 2-3 inch segments
  • 1 red onion, sliced thin
  • 3 parts water
  • 1 part distilled white vinegar
  • salt
  • sugar

In plastic tupperware or similar container with a lid, combine the ingredients--filling with enough water and vinegar to cover. Season with bit of salt and sugar to cut down on the acidity. Close container and set in the refrigerator. The pickled vegetables should be ready after 1 day and lasts for about 1 week.

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20 Ways to Impress the Boss


Be a Better Employee

By Kate Lorenz, Editor

Whether you're vying for a promotion or just want to make a good impression, here are 20 ways to show you're dream team material:


1. Know the mission. Align yourself with your boss' and company's goals and values. Make your boss' priorities your priorities.


2. Understand how you'll be evaluated. Know precisely which skills, behaviors and accomplishments you will be judged on and rewarded. Focus on them like a laser.


3. Be dependable. Do what you say you're going to do. Better yet, under-promise and over-deliver.


4. Project positive energy. Don't be the one to whine or criticize the boss or company direction. Be a motivator: the person everyone wants to be around.


5. Make your boss look good. Finish your work on time and with a high level of professionalism. Bring your boss ideas that will help him and the department and offer to take charge and implement them.


6. Own up. Take responsibility for your mistakes by focusing on what you've learned rather than what you've done wrong. For example, "I think this project could have been better if we'd gotten the group's buy-in early on," or "Next time I would talk more with the end-users up-front..."


7. Be organized. Plan your next day before you leave work. Rank your tasks by urgency and importance and make a point of doing at least the top two items on your list.


8. Be punctual. Arriving for work or meetings on time (even early) shows you're enthusiastic, dependable and able to manage your life effectively.


9. Be resourceful. Don't run to the boss with every question you have or setback you encounter. Think things through first. If you must report a problem to the boss, develop possible solutions to present.


10. Broaden your horizons. Take advantage of company-sponsored training courses and volunteer for projects in areas outside your everyday expertise.


11. Stay informed. Keep abreast of industry and company trends by reading trade journals and attending professional association events.


12. Be trendy. Stay current with technological, legal and knowledge advances in your area. Upgrade your skills and learn new ones.


13. Be courteous. Show respect and loyalty to your boss and speak well of her to others. (At the very least don't bad mouth her to anyone.)


14. Be flexible. Change is inevitable. Companies need people who can adapt and go with the flow.


15. Take care of your health. When you're run-down, productivity and ambition suffer -- as does your image.


16. Leave your personal life at the door. Using your co-workers as therapists not only hurts productivity; it damages your credibility and can contaminate your work relationships (even if people seem sympathetic).


17. Go beyond the call of duty. Take on added challenges, put in extra hours, and never use the phrase, "That's not in my job description."


18. Be a team player. Show your boss and co-workers you have their best interests at heart by being empathetic and offering to help out when they need it.


19. Take a break now and then. A clear head and balanced life can give you energy and perspective.


20. Look and act promotable. Don't let anyone think you work because you have to.



Copyright 2010 All rights reserved. The information contained in this article may not be published, broadcast or otherwise distributed without prior written authority.


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Ý nghĩa của tiếng thở dài ...

Quan tòa hỏi một nhân chứng nữ:
-Có chồng hay chưa? 

Bà này thở dài. 


Tòa nói với thư ký:
-Ghi đi: chưa chồng. 


Một lát sau quan toà hỏi một nhân chứng nam:
- Đã có vợ chưa?

Người này cũng thở dài.


Tòa nói:
-Ghi đi: đã có vợ.


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Steamed Bean Curd with XO Sauce


1 Tbsp Lee Kum Kee Premium Oyster Flavored Sauce

3 Tbsp Lee Kum Kee XO Sauce

14oz bean curd




Mix bean curd with the sauces and put on a deep serving plate

Steam bean curd over high heat for 10 minutes or until done.

Garnish with green onion and red chili.



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Did you know that just one-quarter cup of walnuts contains over 90% of the daily value for those hard-to-find omega-3 essential fatty acids? They are called "essential" because they are a special protective type of fat that cannot be manufactured by our body and therefore must be supplied by the foods we eat. Researchers believe that about 60% of Americans are deficient in omega-3 fatty acids, and about 20% have so little that tests cannot even detect any in their blood. The list of benefits derived from omega-3s is impressive, ranging from improving cholesterol levels and reducing the risk of stroke to acting as anti-inflammatory agents and improving bone density. Enjoying walnuts as part of your Healthiest Way of Eating not only adds wonderful taste and texture to your meals, but it is an easy way to include more omega-3s into your diet. Walnuts also contain ellagic acida compound that supports the immune system and appears to have anticancer properties.


Health Benefits

When it comes to their health benefits, walnuts definitely are not a hard nut to crack. This delicious nut is an excellent source of omega-3 essential fatty acids, a special type of protective fat the body cannot manufacture. Walnuts' concentration of omega-3s (a quarter-cup provides 90.8% of the daily value for these essential fats) has many potential health benefits ranging from cardiovascular protection, to the promotion of better cognitive function, to anti-inflammatory benefits helpful in asthma, rheumatoid arthritis, and inflammatory skin diseases such as eczema and psoriasis. In addition, walnuts contain an antioxidant compound called ellagic acid that supports the immune system and appears to have several anticancer properties.


Take Walnuts to Heart

Adding walnuts to your diet can be an important step in improving your cardiovascular health. Walnuts are an important source of monounsaturated fats-approximately 15% of the fat found in walnuts is healthful monounsaturated fat. A host of studies have shown that increasing the dietary intake of monounsaturated-dense walnuts has favorable effects on high cholesterol levels and other cardiovascular risk factors. One particular study compared the effects of a cholesterol-lowering Mediterranean diet with an adjusted Mediterranean diet in which 35% of the calories derived from monounsaturated fats came from walnuts. When following the walnut-rich diet, the 49 study participants were found to have lower levels of total cholesterol, LDL (the dangerous form) cholesterol and Lp(a) ("lipoprotein a," another lipid compound that increases blood clotting and, when elevated, is considered a risk factor for atherosclerosis).

In addition to their heart-protective monounsaturated fats, walnuts' concentration of omega-3 essential fatty acids is also responsible for the favorable effects walnut consumption produces on cardiovascular risk factors. Omega-3s benefit the cardiovascular system by helping to prevent erratic heart rhythms, making blood less likely to clot inside arteries (which is the proximate cause of most heart attacks), and improving the ratio of good (HDL) cholesterol to potentially harmful (LDL) cholesterol. Omega-3s also reduce inflammation, which is a key component in the processes that turn cholesterol into artery-clogging plaques.

Since walnuts contain relatively high levels of l-arginine, an essential amino acid, they may also be of special import when it comes to hypertension. In the body (specifically within those hard-working blood vessels), l-arginine is converted into nitric oxide, a chemical that helps keep the inner walls of blood vessels smooth and allows blood vessels to relax. Since individuals with hypertension have a harder time maintaining normal nitric oxide levels, which may also relate to other significant health issues such as diabetes and heart problems, walnuts can serve as a great addition to their diets.

A study published in Phytochemistry sheds further light on walnuts' cardioprotective benefits. Earlier research had already suggested that several polyphenolic compounds found in walnuts, specifically ellagic and gallic acid, possessed antioxidant activity sufficient to inhibit free radical damage to LDL cholesterol. In this new study, researchers identified 16 polyphenols, including three new tannins, with antioxidant activity so protective they describe it as "remarkable."

Walnuts' Antioxidants Play Key Role in their Heart-Healthy Benefits

Research published in the British Journal of Nutrition (Blomhoff R, Carlsen MH), which identified several nuts among plant foods with the highest total antioxidant content, suggests nut's high antioxidant content may be key to their cardio-protective effects.

Walnuts, pecans and chestnuts have the highest antioxidant content of the tree nuts, with walnuts delivering more than 20 mmol antioxidants per 3 ounces (100 grams). Peanuts (although technically, a legume) also contribute significantly to our dietary intake of antioxidants.

Nuts' high antioxidant content helps explain results seen in the Iowa Women's Health Study in which risk of death from cardiovascular and coronary heart diseases showed strong and consistent reductions with increasing nut/peanut butter consumption. Total death rates decreased 11% and 19% for nut/peanut butter intake once per week and 1-4 times per week, respectively.

Even more impressive were the results of a review study of the evidence linking nuts and lower risk of coronary heart disease, also published in the British Journal of Nutrition. (Kelly JH, Sabate J.) In this study, researchers looked at four large prospective epidemiological studies-the Adventist Health Study, Iowa Women's Study, Nurses' Health Study and the Physician's Health Study. When evidence from all four studies was combined, subjects consuming nuts at least 4 times a week showed a 37% reduced risk of coronary heart disease compared to those who never or seldom ate nuts. Each additional serving of nuts per week was associated with an average 8.3% reduced risk of coronary heart disease.

Practical Tip: To lower your risk of cardiovascular and coronary heart disease, enjoy a handful of walnuts, or other antioxidant-rich nuts, at least 4 times a week.

Walnuts Help Prevent and Control High Blood Pressure

Individuals whose diets provide greater amounts of omega-3 fatty polyunsaturated fatty acids-and walnuts are an excellent source of these essential fats-have lower blood pressure than those who consume less, shows data gathered in the International Study of Macro- and Micro-nutrients and Blood Pressure (INTERMAP) study (Ueshima H, Stamler J, et al. Hypertension).

The INTERMAP is a study of lifestyle factors, including diet, and their effect on blood pressure in 4,680 men and women aged 40 to 59 living in Japan, China, the U.S. and the U.K. Blood pressure was measured and dietary recall questionnaires were completed by participants on four occasions. Dietary data was analyzed for levels of omega-3 fatty acids from food sources including fish, nuts, seeds and vegetable oils.

Average daily intake of omega-3 fatty acids was 2 grams. Participants with a high (o.67% kcal) omega-3 fatty acid percentage of their daily calorie intake had an average systolic and diastolic blood pressure reading that was 0.55/0.57 mm Hg less, respectively, than participants with lower intake. Previous research has found that a decrease of 2 mm Hg reduces the population-wide average stroke mortality rate by 6 percent and that of coronary heart disease by 4%.

Higher omega-3 fatty acid intake among the 2,238 subjects who were not using drugs, supplements, or a special diet for hypertension, heart disease, or diabetes was associated with a 1.01/0.98 mm Hg reduction in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively.

For the 2,038 subjects in this group who did not have hypertension, greater intake was associated with a 0.91/0.92 mm Hg average systolic and diastolic reduction.

Lead author Hirotsugu Ueshima, MD of Shiga University of Medical Science in Japan, noted that the beneficial effect of omega-3 fats was even greater in people who had not yet developed high blood pressure.

The researchers also found that omega-3s from nuts, seeds, and vegetable oils-such as walnuts and flaxseed-had just as much impact on blood pressure as omega-3s from fish. "With blood pressure, every millimeter counts. The effect of each nutrient is apparently small but independent, so together they can add up to a substantial impact on blood pressure. If you can reduce blood pressure a few millimeters from eating less salt, losing a few pounds, avoiding heavy drinking, eating more vegetables, whole grains and fruits (for their fiber, minerals, vegetable protein and other nutrients) and getting more omega-3 fatty acids, then you've made a big difference," said Ueshima.

Walnuts Improve Cholesterol Profile in Persons with Type 2 Diabetes

In patients with type 2 diabetes, including a daily ounce of walnuts in a diet in which 30% of calories came from fat translated into a significant improvement in subjects' cholesterol profile.

In this study, published in Diabetes Care, 58 men and women with an average age of 59 years, were assigned to one of three diets in which 30% of calories was derived from fat: a low fat diet, a modified low fat diet, and a modified low fat diet including an ounce of walnuts per day.

After 6 months, those on the walnut diet had achieved a significantly greater increase in their HDL-to-total cholesterol ratio than the other groups, plus walnut eaters saw a 10% reduction in their LDL cholesterol. Why such benefit from walnuts? Most likely because walnuts are exceptionally high in their content of monounsaturated fat and the omega-3 fatty acid, alpha-linolenic acid. Plus, walnuts combine these heart healthy fats with a hefty dose of the antioxidants including at least 16 antioxidant phenols, vitamin E, ellagic and gallic acid.


Additional research has confirmed that when walnuts are eaten as part of a modified low-fat diet, the result is a more cardiprotective fat profile in diabetic patients than can be achieved by simply lowering the fat content of the diet. In a study published in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, all 55 study participants with type 2 diabetes were put on low fat diets, but the only group to achieve a cardioprotective fat profile (less than 10% of calories from saturated fat, 7-10% of calories from polyunsaturated fats, adequate omega-3 fats, and an omega-6:omega-3 ratio of less than 10) were those who ate walnuts (30 grams-about one ounce-per day).



Walnuts Found to Reduce Levels of Several Molecules that Promote Atherosclerosis

In addition to walnuts' beneficial effects on cholesterol, more insight into the reasons why walnuts reduce the risk of coronary heart disease were revealed in research published in the Journal of Nutrition.

The study involved 20 overweight or obese men, 30 to 60 years old, and 3 menopausal women, aged 55-65, all of whom had elevated LDL cholesterol levels. Each subject was assigned to one of the three diets on a rotating six-week basis with a two-week break between each one. The average American diet served as the control diet, while the two experimental diets were a linoleic acid (LA) diet that included an ounce of walnuts and a teaspoon of walnut oil daily, and an alpha-linoleic acid diet (ALA), which added a teaspoon of flaxseed oil, which is especially high in ALA, to the linoleic diet.

Both experimental diets resulted in positive effects, with the ALA diet providing the most benefit. In addition to lowering LDL cholesterol, the walnut-rich ALA diet:

  • lowered levels of C-reactive protein, a marker of inflammation strongly associated with atherosclerosis and heart disease
    • increased levels of the protective omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and
  • decreased levels of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 and E-selection, all of which are involved in cholesterol's adhesion to the endothelium (the lining of the arteries).
E-selectin, a molecule that plays a role in cell adhesion-the process by which damaged cholesterol adheres to blood vessel walls to form plaques-also fell after the walnut meal. Many people forget that walnuts are an important part of the Mediterranean diet, providing numerous health benefits…Walnuts, unlike olive oil and other nuts, contain significant amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids, specifically alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), an essential plant-based omega-3. They also provide antioxidants and L-arginine, components identified in past studies as potential nutrients that improve artery function., said Dr. Ross. Robert Vogel, a researcher from the University of Maryland, who did not participate in the study, commented:

Walnuts Protect Arteries after High-Fat Meal

Walnuts, a rich source of the omega-3 fat, alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), improve artery function after a high fat meal and may be even more important in a Mediterranean-type diet than olive oil in promoting heart health, suggests a small study from Spain (Cortes B, Nunez I, J Am Coll Cardiol).

The study, funded by the California Walnut Commission and the Spanish Ministry of Health, looked at the effects on a number of markers of cardiovascular health of adding walnuts or olive oil to a fatty meal.

Twelve healthy people and 12 patients with high cholesterol levels were randomly assigned to eat either a high-fat meal (80 g fat, 35 per cent saturated fat) that also included 40 grams of walnuts or one that included 25 grams of olive oil (30 grams = 1 ounce). After one week, the participants eating walnuts were crossed over to olive oil and visa versa.

The researchers evaluated the activity of the subjects' blood vessels after the meal, and looked at cholesterol and triglyceride levels, as well as markers of free radical (oxidative) stress and blood levels of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA). AMDA is a by-product of the metabolism of the protein, arginine, that is said to interfere with the amino acid L-arginine, which is involved in the production of nitric oxide (NO). NO acts upon smooth muscle in blood vessels, causing them to dilate and thus increasing blood flow.

The researchers reported that blood flow in the brachial artery of the arm, (flow-mediated dilation) increased 24% in the subjects with high cholesterol after they ate the walnut-containing meal, while the olive oil-containing meal actually resulted in a 36% decrease in blood flow.

However, levels of cholesterol and triglycerides decreased in similar amounts after both meals. Blood levels of ADMA were not affected by either walnuts or olive oil. The fact that a single walnut meal positively affects postprandial vasoactivity further supports the beneficial effects of walnuts on cardiovascular risk, wrote lead author Berenice Cortés in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.







This demonstrates that the protective fat from walnuts actually undoes some of the detrimental effects of a high-saturated-fat diet, whereas a neutral fat, such as olive oil, does not have as much protective ability>,/q> This raises a very interesting issue because many people who eat a Mediterranean diet believe the olive oil is providing the benefits. But this research and other data indicate that's not true…There are probably other factors in the diet, including that it is a relatively rich source of nuts. This is not to say that olive oil is bad, but it's not the key protective factor in the Mediterranean diet, said Vogel.



This does not mean that simply eating a handful of walnuts can make up for an unhealthy diet. Consumers would get the wrong message from our findings if they think they can continue eating unhealthy fats provided they add walnuts to their meals, said study author Emilio Ros from the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona. While this research clearly indicates that nuts are highly beneficial, they are only one component of the Mediterranean diet. Rich in vegetables, fruits, legumes, whole grains, fish and olive oil, as well as nuts, the Mediterranean diet includes literally thousands of protective vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients. It's the combination of all these beneficial compounds that explains why this healthy way of eating is associated with longer life and protection against numerous diseases including cardiovascular disease, cognitive decline, and a number of cancers.


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Love Quote

Famous Quotes


"Love is that condition in which the happiness of another person is essential to your own. -Robert Heinlein"

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Cleaning Shower Heads


Cleaning Shower Heads

We don't usually consider our shower heads when cleaning a bathroom, but we should. Especially if we have what is considered "hard water." Lime and mineral deposits can clog the holes of the shower head giving us less water pressure, which means a less productive shower. Fortuanately there's a simple bathroom cleaning tip to hand this. Warm some vinegar in a microwave and pour into a ziplock bag large enough to place your shower fixture. Leave the shower head in the warm vinegar bath for about an hour. After that time, discard the vinegar and use a toothbrush to clean off any remaining mineral deposits. Rinse in warm water.

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Top 10 Ways to Maintain Your Weight



Top 10 Ways to Maintain Your Weight

By Frances Largeman, R.D.
Losing weight and eating better may often seem like a lot of work, but these easy steps will help keep you on course:


  1. Take a walk. America is in the midst of an obesity epidemic, which is slated to only get worse over the next decade. An extra 20 minutes of physical activity a day, or an additional 2,000 steps, is all we need to avoid weight gain, according to Dr. James Hill, obesity researcher and co-founder of America on the Move. How do you know how many steps you're taking? Clip a pedometer to your belt and get moving! Everything from walking the dog to grocery shopping counts.

  2. Eat an apple. Apples contain 15 percent of the recommended daily allowance for vitamin C. In addition to contributing to overall health, fruits rich in vitamin C, an antioxidant, have recently been linked to a decreased risk of coronary heart disease and cancer. Fit two to three servings (or more) of fruit into your daily diet.

  3. Say no to trans fat. Like saturated fats, trans fats raise total cholesterol and LDL, the "bad" cholesterol levels. Trans fats also lower levels of beneficial HDL cholesterol in the body. Additionally, consumption of trans fats may inhibit the absorption of healthy fats that are necessary for the growth and functioning of vital organs.

  4. Go easy on the booze. This means an average of one to two drinks per day for men and one drink per day for women. (A drink equals 12 ounces of beer, 4 ounces of wine, 1.5 ounces of 80-proof spirits or 1 ounce of 100-proof spirits.) Drinking more than moderately can increase the risk of such dangers as alcoholism, high blood pressure, obesity, stroke, breast cancer, suicide and accidents.

  5. Get a doggie bag. Portion sizes in restaurants and fast-food chains have exploded in recent years, and many of us just can't help but clear our plates. Ask for a to-go container when you order. That way you can pack up half your entrée to enjoy the next day.

  6. Have a yogurt. It's no secret that calcium helps keep bones strong, but there's more reason than ever to eat yogurt for bone health. Some yogurt brands now contain inulin, a naturally occurring, fiber-like carbohydrate that's found in fruits and vegetables. Inulin has been found to increase the activity of live cultures and prevent the growth of harmful bacteria in the digestive tract. Best of all, it aids in the absorption of calcium.

  7. Take your vitamins. A study in the Journal of Nutrition showed that taking a daily multivitamin reduced the risk of a first heart attack in both men and women. Authors of the study think this effect is due to the B vitamins found in multivitamins, as well as the antioxidant vitamins, C and E, selenium and beta carotene. Vitamin supplements are no substitute for the nutrients you get from food, but they're a good way to cover your bases.

  8. Hold the salt shaker. Excess sodium intake can lead to high blood pressure (hypertension). More than 50 million Americans — or one in four — have high blood pressure and a third of them don't know it. High blood pressure contributes to the risk of heart and kidney disease and stroke. Use fresh herbs to boost the flavor of the foods you cook — you'll get lots of delicious flavor, without the sodium.

  9. Switch to whole grains. Whole grains are richer in nutrients and fiber than refined grains. Whole grains help keep you regular, too. Reach for whole-wheat bread over white and brown rice over white. Popcorn and oatmeal are whole grains, too.

  10. Hit the water cooler. Water is important for all metabolic processes in the body. It also helps with digestion and weight loss and improves the appearance of your skin. Drinking eight to 10 8-ounce glasses of water each day is key, but eating foods with a high-water content (like fruits and vegetables) also will contribute to your water intake.

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10 Foods That May Improve Your Appearance

10 Foods That May Improve Your Appearance

1. Blood oranges, cherries and blueberries
Collagen is a natural protein in your skin and muscles that provides resiliency, shape and texture. Unfortunately, collagen production decreases with age— but you can fight back with dark fruit. "Blood oranges, cherries and blueberries are full of antioxidants, which decrease aging and disease by lowering inflammation. Antioxidants also increase collagen production and thicken the skin, making you look younger and healthier," says Julia Tatum Hunter, M.D., of Skin Fitness Plus in Beverly Hills. "Antioxidants also decrease [the severity of] rosacea." Blackberries, raspberries, plums, pomegranates, cranberries, Asian dragon fruit and kiwis also contain antioxidants.

2. Shellfish, sunflower seeds and sardines
These foods may not taste great together, but individually they offer a powerhouse of essential fatty acids. Steven Chang, M.D., staff physician for, says fatty acids nourish the skin, help maintain skin integrity and keep skin cells performing optimally. "Essential fatty acids, a component of all cell membranes in the body, regulate the flow of nutrients, waste materials, and water in and out of cells—which keeps you looking young." Flax seeds, tuna, walnuts, canola oil, soybean oil and pumpkin seeds are more good sources of essential fatty acids.


3. Dandelion, turnip and mustard greens
"Foods that keep our livers cleansed of toxins, heavy metals and fats make our whole body function more efficiently," says Dr. Hunter. "This makes us happier, which affects how we look. Plus, a healthy liver brightens our eyes and tightens our skin." She recommends dense green foods such as broccoli, spinach and arugula—as well as turnip, mustard and dandelion greens. Eating these slightly bitter greens has been shown to lessen your sweet tooth. Hunter warns: "Simple and refined sugars, high-glycemic carbohydrates, and refined, manufactured foods age us." Excess sugar has been linked to a process called glycation, in which sugar molecules bond to protein molecules, which has been linked to sagging, wrinkled skin.
4. Oregano, thyme and parsley
"If you have puffy bags under your eyes in the morning, you are almost certainly consuming much more salt than you need," says Doris Day, M.D., author of Forget the Facelift: Turn Back the Clock with a Revolutionary Program for Ageless Skin (Avery, 2005). "Another problem is alcohol: It dehydrates you and can make your skin sag. The worst combination is alcohol and salt, which causes puffy dark circles under your eyes." Dr. Day recommends reducing your sodium intake to eliminate bloating. Instead of salt, season your meals with herbs and spices such as oregano, thyme, rosemary, parsley and garlic.
5. Crunchy vegetables
Fresh raw veggies are as good for your grin as they are for your skin! Celery, carrots, string beans and cauliflower contain cellulose, which helps scrub stains from your teeth—giving you a whiter, brighter smile. "Both the cellulose and the [other] fiber in these foods act as abrasives that clean and remove bacteria from teeth," says Mickey Bernstein, M.D., president of the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. Crunchy veggies are especially effective for recent discolorations. If you've just consumed blueberries, coffee, mustard, red wine or cranberry juice, follow it up with fresh cucumber slices or an apple.
6. Sea vegetables
"Polluted cells can't function at their optimum level. When our cells are functioning optimally, not only do we have more energy—we look and feel great," says nutritionist Carol Wasserman. "Sea vegetables are one of our richest sources of minerals and phytochemicals." These veggies help detoxify, rebuild and nourish all the cells in our body. Unhealthy foods, stress and environmental pollutants cause cells to age prematurely, potentially leading to thinning hair and premature wrinkles. "Sea vegetables reverse this process," says Wasserman. "For example, spirulina is a 'detox powerhouse.' Hijiki, kelp, arame, wakame, and dulse also work wonders."
7. Meat, cheese and lentils
It may take 10 pounds of milk to make a pound of cheese, but fortunately you don't need to eat that much dairy or protein to repair your cells. As you age, your hair and skin cells become damaged, making you appear older. The protein in meat, chicken, low-fat cheese, cottage cheese, and certain vegetables promotes cell growth and repair, which translates to younger-looking skin, fewer wrinkles, less hair loss and a glossy mane. To take a break from meat or dairy, try soybeans and lentils instead (they contain more protein than any other legume).
8. Egg yolks, organ meats and whole-milk products
Dr. Chang says, "Vitamin A is especially important for skin repair, and decreased levels can lead to dry, flaky skin." Dr. Day adds that a lack of vitamin A may cause your skin to heal poorly and wrinkle easily. The main sources of this vitamin are foods from animals, such as liver, eggs and whole-milk dairy products. Some plants—carrots and broccoli, for example—supply beta-carotene, which your body converts to vitamin A as needed. Apricots, nectarines, plums and cantaloupe are more great sources of beta-carotene.


9. Almond or hemp "milk"
Almond milk is a nutritious dairy alternative because of its high levels of magnesium, potassium, manganese, copper, vitamin E, selenium and calcium. Licensed medical esthetician Tina Seitz says, "Hemp milk is a delicious, nutty-tasting non-dairy beverage that provides essential balanced nutrition. It's a fantastic alternative to soymilk or dairy, and has a natural well-balanced ratio of omega-3 and omega-6 essential fatty acids to keep your mind sharp, your immune system strong and your skin glowing." Both almond and hemp milks are plant-based, and don't contain lactose. They offer high-quality protein that can give hair a radiant, healthy shine and helps keep skin soft.


10. Wild salmon with avocado and mango dressing
This is more than a delicious meal—it's an anti-aging feast! Stephen Sinatra, M.D., of the University of Connecticut School of Medicine says, "Wild Alaskan salmon has precious omega-3 essential fatty acids, which enhance blood flow. The pink/orange color of wild salmon is an anti-aging carotenoid called astaxanthin that protects cell membranes." Salmon also contains dimethylaminoethanol (DMAE), which improves facial muscle tone and reduces wrinkles. Add avocado for its antioxidant properties and mango (for vitamin E and anti-inflammatory carotenoids) and you'll be sitting pretty after dinner!